What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami

After the whirlwind of a book that I finished yesterday, I drew a lot of comfort reading Murakami’s What I Talk About when I Talk about Running. For a person like me who finds comfort in a long, solitary sport like distance running, it is so easy to connect and identify with Murakami. I understand completely the struggles of training, the desire to just slog it off and sleep instead of punishing yourself to miles on the road. I like that he was honest about his failures, his somewhat competitive fiber that drives him to run faster, his frustration of not getting the PR he wanted, and the struggle to balance work, family and sport. It’s a memoir after all, covering the ugly tracks would have been pointless and futile. It’s cool to atleast know that a writer on Murakami’s caliber can still find the time to run. The reason: he loves it. Crazy for most but he likes it. As much as I do. 4/5
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The lines that I love:
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“I just want to make sure I get the facts down clearly: I’m the kind of person who likes to be by himself. To put a finer point on it, I’m the type of person who doesn’t find it painful to be alone.” .
“In certain areas of my life, I actively seek out solitude.” .
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“I had to gibe it everything I had. If I failed, I could accept that. But I knew that if I did things half heartedly and they didn’t work out, I’d always have regrets.”. .
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“Running has a lot of advantages. First of all, you don’t need anybody else to do it, and no need for special equipment. You don’t have to go to any special place to do it. As long aa you have running shoes and a good road you can run to your heart’s content.” .
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“For a runner like me, what’s really important is reaching the goal I set myself, under my own power. I give it everything I have, endure what needs enduring, and am able, in my own way, to be satisfied.”

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One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Okay, here’s the thing about this book, if you are in for some laid back read, DO NOT read One Hundred Years of Solitude. It takes a LOT of concentration to keep track of the events and the names of who married whom and what happened to this and that. I have too many what the fck moments in my five days of agony trying to finish this book. If a teacher would ask me what the theme of the book is, it would be: incest, insanity, extreme introversion and crazy martyrdom. I lost track of the names and number of nephews Amaranta seduced in her bed, I have forgotten if it was Arcadio or Areliano who married a nine year old girl while he was in his fortys? Ghads, the names were almost always the same in a long line of family history. I have this vague suspicion that Marquez was simply having a good time fcking up with our brains that he didn’t really have a noble goal of producing that book but simply wanted a good laugh from getting too much hate of those who have read his work. Well, I finished it, and I hated it. He was successful. 1/5